fist of wind: A poetry chapbook by nefertiti asanti

by Oct 15, 2021Announcements

Join us for the book launch here with Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD) and Foglifter!  


 

Foglifter Press is proud to announce fist of wind, a lyrical testimony that centers the Black body as a site of healing and transformation. This chapbook/collection of poetry explores the lived experience of menstruation marked by pain and the liminal existence of Black folk as magical and mortal. fist of wind draws from magical realism to ask: If pain is information, what does individual and collective Black pain tell us about our world and about ourselves? How do we embody healing in this lifetime and beyond?

Nefertiti Asanti is a poet born and raised in the Bronx and a recipient of fellowships and residencies from the Watering Hole, EmergeNYC, Lambda Literary, Anaphora Arts, Winter Tangerine, and the Hurston/Wright Foundation. Nefertiti is also a 2021 PEN America Emerging Voices fellow. Currently, Nefertiti serves as prose poetry editor of Stellium Literary Magazine.

Nefertiti Asanti is the first winner of the Start A Riot! Chapbook Prize. In response to rapid gentrification and displacement of QTBIPOC+ literary artists in the San Francisco Bay Area, and in celebration of these communities’ revolutionary history, Foglifter Press, RADAR Productions, and Still Here San Francisco joined forces to create a chapbook prize for local emerging queer and trans Black writers, indigenous writers, and writers of color. Each year, one chapbook author is awarded publication, a $1,000 prize, and promotion, as well as a spot on RADAR’s Sister Spit tour. Send your submission here!

 

 


“fist of wind is testimony to the violence of the medical-industrial complex and the long-term effects that neglect, classism, and gender-based biases have on Black community members. Written through stunning lyricism and melody, Nefertiti Asanti, as poet, as truth-teller, and as a relative whispers to those in the Black diaspora, “Do not keep your grief in a bag of your own skin,” reminding us that we are worthy of protection, healing and community. An incredible intervention to the fields of disability poetics and LGBTQIA+ poetry, fist of wind, teaches us that disability justice is not about equality or recognition, but about building a future and a politic of care that doesn’t leave anyone behind yet leaves room for people to “love every sin [they] dared to commit.” Like Asanti’s words read, this collection of poems make me want ” . . . to stain / teacups, chipped & marked fragile when they are not really,” in the hopes that perhaps, that staining is what gets Black disabled people heard and prioritized in our visions of liberation.” 

—Alan Pelaez Lopez, author of Intergalactic Travels: poems from a fugitive alien

 

“From its very first line, Nefertiti Asanti’s fist of wind held me breathless. Asanti’s brilliant, urgent composition kept me spellbound as it layered the suffering of one human atop the injustice to the many—leaving me swirling in the afterglow of lamentation, affirmation, and prayer.” 

—Ryka Aoki, author of Light From Uncommon Stars

fist of wind heralds a brave new syntax gleaming with unmuzzled viscera. In this work, the archive trills, bloodstained, breathing, and endogenous, to reckon with our gynecological foremothers. Nefertiti’s poetry dethrones meaning for music, flipping language to reveal its guttural underbelly and aural ritual. These poems are dazzling transgressions against bondage and biology itself.”

—Xandria Phillips, author of HULL

“Nefertiti Asanti’s fist of wind is unapologetically uterine. These poems bleed syntactically, beautifully, with rigor and risk that makes you exclaim. Asanti reckons with a legacy of misogynoir and antiblackness that dismisses the physical, emotional, and spiritual pain endured by Black menstrual bodies. Using her own challenges with PMDD, what’s so tenderly held in the palm of Asanti’s fist of wind are the questions: do we really care? Do our medical and political systems have a capacity to really care for Black folks who bleed? And because we haven’t figured that out yet, these poems prefigure our future.”

—Arisa White, author of Who’s Your Daddy?

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Wow! We had the best time at this past Sunday's reading with the San Francisco Public Library Thank you so much to our fantastic readers—@emo.ocean (Lio Min), @real_james_cagney, @charliejaneanders, and Lydia Elias—for sharing their incredible writing and starting a warm dialogue on the importance of queer spaces.We'd also like to give a huge shoutout to the amazing folks who helped make our event as accessible as possible! Thank you to our ASL interpreters Heidi Woelbling and Benny Llamas, and to our live-captioner Jen Schuck. We're so grateful for your hard work!Keep an eye out for a recording of this event on the SFPL Youtube page! We'll announce when it's ready. Until then, please go follow and support these writers and their work!Image Description: A screenshot of a Zoom room with Lio Min, James Cagney, Lydia Elias, and Charlie Jane Anders. They are all smiling and listening to each other. There is some closed captioning towards the bottom, that says "I'm really struck by how much vulnerability you all shared. As a writer, I'm curious how you know when you're ready to put a story to the page?" End description. ... See MoreSee Less
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Our virtual reading with the San Francisco Public Library is tomorrow! Join us at 2PM PT for Generational Treasures: An Afternoon of Queer and Trans Storytelling.This fantastic event will feature James Cagney, Lio Min, Charlie Jane Anders, and Lydia Elias! RSVP here: on.sfpl.org/foglifterFoglifter is excited to collaborate with @sfpubliclibrary for Generational Treasures: An Afternoon of Queer and Trans Storytelling! Join us on Sunday, September 25th at 2PM PT for a virtual reading with @charliejaneanders, @emo.ocean, @real_james_cagney, Lydia Elias. In mainstream society, when we hear the word "generations" we may immediately presume biological progeniture. In the Queer/trans community, however, generations can refer to chosen family, drag mothers, drag dads, ball houses, aesthetic legacies, just to name a few. In either context, generations suggest an era. Foglifter has invited four writers—Charlie Jane Anders, James Cagney, Lydia Elias, and Lio Min—who span generations to illustrate their "era" and the power of queer/trans literature. Live-captioning and ASL interpretation will be provided. RSVP here: on.sfpl.org/foglifterSee you then! Image Description: This is an invitation for the reading, “Generational Treasures: An Afternoon of Queer and Trans Storytelling,” presented by the James C. Hormel LGBTQIA Center & Foglifter Journal and Press. This free and virtual reading will take place on Sunday, September 25th at 2PM PT. The photos of James Cagney, Lio Min, Charlie Jane Anders, and Lydia Elias are in the middle of the graphic. The SFPL and Foglifter logos are on the bottom. This background has a colorful gradient of pastel hues and various shapes and swirls, with a square containing all of the text and photos in the middle. ... See MoreSee Less
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There's just ONE WEEK until IT CAME FROM THE CLOSET is available wherever books are sold!!! Have you ordered your copy yet? https://bit.ly/3xAnz9k @joevallese @homohorror

WWS Around Town: This Saturday join this workshop with traci kato-kiriyama (@traciakemi) at @BBLitArts from 12pm-4pm.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/navigating-without-instruments-a-workshop-with-traci-kato-kiriyama-tickets-400498530887

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